When critique groups go bad…

I’m passing this along because it is the only article I’ve seen on this topic. Thank you, Shelley Koon, of SCBWI MD/DE/WV!

As the Eraser Burns

critique_groupsI talk quite a bit about the usefulness of critique groups and why both artists and writers need to seek them out.  From getting feedback to hone your craft, to forging strong relationships with your peers, the benefits of a good critique group are truly endless.

But what if you find yourself in a group that’s not assisting you in your growth? Or maybe you have a great group but have one member that, despite loving nurturing and support, continuously presents work with the same issues? How do you gracefully bow out? How do you let a member know they are not a good fit  while still remaining supportive and positive?

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To All Book Reviewers – A Thank You

Suffolk Scribblings

Thank you

Writing book reviews is tough. It doesn’t matter whether it is a couple of lines and a rating, or a well thought out essay, it takes effort for a reviewer to translate all the emotions and experiences they’ve just felt and translate it into something concise, considered and heartfelt. Many authors complain about how difficult it is to write a plot synopsis or promotional blurb, but it can be just as difficult for reviewers to condense everything they’ve experienced, complete with explanation and reasoning, into a few paragraphs. And then there is the worry about the reaction. Every author understands the anxiety of letting their work go, wondering if people will love or hate what they’ve written, but it is exactly the same for a reviewer, especially if they didn’t enjoy the work they are reviewing.

Some, lucky few, get paid to review books, but most book reviewers do it for free. And this is important for authors to remember…

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